The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis



The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe the first of the seven Chronicles of Narnia. C.S. Lewis takes us on a fantasy journey through the lives of four children who are uprooted from their home in London, due to World War II. The main characters; Lucy, Edmund, Peter, Susan, Aslan, and the White Witch. A few of the supporting characters; Mr. Tumnus and the couple Mr. & Mrs. Beaver. The sisters and brothers begin their journey in this chronological plot when the youngest sibling accidently enters another world through the wardrobe inside the home of the Professor. Yet when her brothers and sister come to find her and they make several visits back to this world they come to find it was not a mistake after all.

There are many themes inside the pages of this book; however, simply they all
entail the main theme of good versus evil.

The setting is a fantasy land of Narnia that is available to those through a magical wardrobe. Once in Narnia, you are among talking animals, and make believe creatures; centaurs, unicorns, fauns, and dwarfs.

This book rates five out of five. I first encountered this story as a play when I was in elementary school, I then read the book the following summer. I have loved it ever since. I find it grows with me over the years as I have returned to Narnia on several occasions, each time I pick up a new theme, and more symbolism.

For this book I would use a QAR reading strategy to build comprehension among the students. There are a lot of ideas, literary elements, vocabulary packaged within this book it would be beneficial to assist the students in unpacking it all or some of it based upon the maturity level. In a public school I would avoid most of the spiritual symbolism that is wrapped up with in the story lines. Providing questions for students to use pre- reading and then ignite discussion once the entire book or each chapter has been read.

I read this book as a part of my #BookaDay Reading Challenge, inspired by Donalyn Miller. My goal is to read at least one children's literature book every weekday and share my thoughts here on my blog. Please feel free to subscribe or connect with me on social media to follow my journey through the books I read. Until next time ...

Freckle Juice by Judy Blume


In the book Freckle Juice, Judy Blume takes us on a hysterical trip through an event
in Andrew Marcus’ life. Andrew has a conflict he does not have any freckles. The
solution is provided by classmate, Sharon. Freckle Juice! She claims to have the recipe
for how Andrew can get freckles of his very own. Very skeptical but desperate Andrew
purchases the recipe and gives it a try. This solution was conflict number two in disguise.
This recipe makes Andrew extremely sick, makes humiliated, and leaves him without
freckles. So when it I time for him to return to school he decides Sharon cannot have the
last laugh, he draws freckles all over his face. Unfortunately, this is not the correct
solution either, fortunately teacher Miss Kelly comes to the rescue with freckle remover.

The Main characters are: Andrew Marcus (protagonist), Sharon (antagonist). A few
of the supporting characters; Miss Kelly and Mrs. Marcus. The theme within these pages is liking who you are, for who you are and for what you have (or don’t have).

The setting is a typical school and home of most children. The plot is relatable to all children; whether they want freckles like a classmate, or blond hair like the girl next door. The story is always the same someone has something that you want. Something that they were created with and you are not. But in the end, you find that how you were made is just as great!

This book rates five out of five. I laughed out loud through the books entirety, even though this is probably my twelveth time reading it. I shared it with my daughter, age 9, who also found it quite comical. I plan on sharing it with my students of all ages in the future! Judy Blume is one of my all-time favorite authors.

I read this book as a part of my #BookaDay Reading Challenge, inspired by Donalyn Miller. My goal is to read at least one children's literature book every weekday and share my thoughts here on my blog. Please feel free to subscribe or connect with me on social media to follow my journey through the books I read. Until next time ...

The Magic Finger by Roald Dahl


A narrative from the girl who is highly against the act of hunting acts upon
her emotions, through as she calls it her magical finger. Dahl brings a social issue
into the life of a child in this humorous adventure. The main character and narrator, a highly opinionated eight- year old girl and the antagonists’ two neighborhood brothers. Supporting characters; Mr. & Mrs. Gregg's and the ducks. The theme is the rights of people to own guns and make game out of shooting innocent animals.

Although this story is placed in a neighborhood similar to those of us reading, the girl is in possession of a magical finger that creates havoc among those who in her eyes, deserve a lesson.

I rate this book a three out of five stars. I am not enthusiastic of the overall plot against hunting. I am sure there are many families that disagree with such ideas. This would be a good book to place in a classroom library to be available to kids who wish to read a new idea, but I would do so with caution in our neighborhoods!

In a classroom setting I believe a think aloud while reading the book to students to assist them with the overall comprehension of the story as the pictures in the book are black and white and difficult to see across a classroom. I think this will also assist children in their thinking in regards to the social issue of guns and hunting.

With older children I would use an Anticipation guide, pulling background information about hunting and guns; as well as, their opinion of their own or their family in regards to these topics. Once the book has been read, I would check back with their ideas and see if anyone had some different views.

I read this book as a part of my #BookaDay Reading Challenge, inspired by Donalyn Miller. My goal is to read at least one children's literature book every weekday and share my thoughts here on my blog. Please feel free to subscribe or connect with me on social media to follow my journey through the books I read. Until next time ...

The Election Book: The People Pick a President by Tamara Henneman


The informational chapter book, The People Pick a President is about the election. Covering the subjects; democracy, the president’s role, how does one become president, the president’s preferred resume, political parties, the campaign, choosing a vice president, election day, electoral college, and the peaceful change of power.

Henneman uses a narrative type of writing within this expository piece. Although her intent is to explain to her readers all about the election; she does so in such a way that it tells a story with beginning, middle, and end. This is a great choice for children as the book is written in a clear, direct, and easily understood; Henneman writes with emotion within the nonfiction writing.
The information within the book is accurate and current. There is no reference section at the end of the book; however, there are a selection of credible election websites that are shared in which you will find similar information provided in the text. The book is written with facts alone. There is no theory or opinions stated within the material. The information shared is without conversation of the author or other people’s point of view.

This book rates five out of five. The book gives plenty of knowledge for the student of any age to learn about the election process. As I was reading this week, I found a few things regarding the electoral college that I was unaware of. Clearly written for the upper elementary student in such a way that is easy to understand this complex subject without “dumbing” the concept down.

The three ways that I may use this book in the upper elementary classroom within a government unit are as follows: Guided Reading, Teaching Vocabulary in Context, and QAR.

Guided Reading – Each day before reading a new chapter of the book, describe the information that they are reading and assist the students to discuss the information that they know. Give the students questions to assist them in their reading; asking them to locate main ideas that you would like them to take away in their reading.

Teaching Vocabulary in Context- The book provides a glossary section; selecting five or six words that are new to the student and write them on the board. Find them within the text and write the sentence it is used in with the word. Have students read the sentences out loud as a group. Discuss with students what they believe the word means based on the sentence it is written and write these on the board. As a class, agree upon the meaning of the vocabulary words; compare them with the glossary definition in the book.

QAR – Ask literal questions students can pull from their reading, use questions that will allow students to pull in text from several areas of the book and think about the context and meaning of the book, further thinking by asking questions based on the book and what the student believes, and ask students their personal ideas on the topics of the book.

I read this book as a part of my #BookaDay Reading Challenge, inspired by Donalyn Miller. My goal is to read at least one children's literature book every weekday and share my thoughts here on my blog. Please feel free to subscribe or connect with me on social media to follow my journey through the books I read. Until next time ...

Mississippi Bridge by Mildred D. Taylor


In the story, Mississippi Bridge Taylor exhibits an exceptional picture of what life was like in the 1930’s in the state of Mississippi. The description of racism that Black families and individuals had to suffer through was horrific. Conflict of the story; character versus character which is underneath the overwhelming conflict of character versus society. During a rainstorm a bus is filled with black and white men and women; until the bus is too full for the remaining white people to come aboard. The bus driver rudely removes (some physically) the last black people from the back of the bus to seat them. The bus filled with white men, women, and children adventure off across the Rosa Lee Creek. The bus spins out and falls in the creek. The black people who were removed from the bus on their way home were the first to jump in the creek to save and recover the white people.

The main character and narrator of this story, 10-year-old, white boy, Jeremy Simms. The remainder of the characters are supporting characters with various roles in relation to the main character Jeremy. Lilian, sister; R.W., older brother; Melvin; Store Owner, Mr. Wallace; Former Teacher, Miz Hattie, Miz Hattie’s granddaughter, Grace-Anne; Jeremy’s Father, Pa; alongside many bus riders.

The main themes of this book is discrimination and racism. Shown by the people in this Mississippi town and being discovered and grappled with by the narrator, 10-year old, white Jeremy. Taylor uses the narrator to tell the story as he experiences the events that take place around him. Taylor chooses to use the speech of the South to help the reader understand the characters. The repetitive use of the word, nigger is harsh however, it is the correct word that black people were called in this time and place. The racism and hatred toward black people in the South. The placing of black people as second class citizens that are forced to sit in the back of the bus.

This book rates five out of five. After getting past the overuse of the word, nigger, I could identify with the ten-year-old Jeremy Simms and is ability to grapple through the racism around him. I would tread carefully with sharing this with students with the use of the “n” word; although this depicts this time in America extremely well.

The three ways that I may use this book in the upper elementary classroom are as follows: Guided Reading, Vocabulary Building, and QAR.

     Guided Reading – Each day before reading describe the events that are occurring and          assist the students to put words to their feelings. Give them questions to assist them in            their reading passage.

     Vocabulary Building- There are a lot of idioms in the book. Taking time to define                these phrases to assist the students in their understanding.

     QAR – Ask literal questions students can pull from their reading, use questions that will        allow students to pull in text from several areas of the book and think about the context          and meaning of the book, further thinking by asking questions based on the book and              what the student believes, and ask students their personal ideas on the themes of the               book.

I read this book as a part of my #BookaDay Reading Challenge, inspired by Donalyn Miller. My goal is to read at least one children's literature book every weekday and share my thoughts here on my blog. Please feel free to subscribe or connect with me on social media to follow my journey through the books I read. Until next time ...

Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina


The setting is within a small town and the countryside, where the main character (round character) a peddler is pursing the sale of his caps. The conflict person- against-self is introduced as he has no money and he is hungry (a conflict that is not solved within the text). He takes a walk to the country where he encounters conflict number two, persons-against-person (monkey to be exact). Slobodkina uses irony in her book, Caps for Sale to surprise her readers when the plot twists and this conflict is resolved. The story sends the peddler back to the town to continue his pursuit of his selling of caps.

The pictures are drawings of realistic art giving the reader the opportunity to see what the peddler sees and does, clearly conveying the story events written in the
text. The illustrations of the book are on the opposite page of the text; giving the reader the ability to read the text and then see these words come to life in the following picture.

Image: The Brown Road Chronicles
This book rates four out of five. I enjoyed the solution to the conflict; however, I am not sure the peddler solved it on purpose. Though the monkey business did seem to add entertainment to this book. I was saddened by the books inability to solve his initial problem of being hungry. I question the addition to the plot, when there was no conclusion to this problem. Only a new conflict was added and solved and he continued in an answer for this problem. I would have liked to seen this problem solved, maybe the peddler could have the used the monkey’s and their monkey business to create an act for the townspeople when he returned.



I read this book as a part of my #BookaDay Reading Challenge, inspired by Donalyn Miller. My goal is to read at least one children's literature book every weekday and share my thoughts here on my blog. Please feel free to subscribe or connect with me on social media to follow my journey through the books I read. Until next time ...

The Boy of Fairfield Street: How Ted Geisel Grew Up to Become Dr. Seuss by Kathleen Krull


The biography written by Krull is of the famous author, Ted Geisel. Better known by the name of Dr. Seuss. Ted Geisel (1904 -1991), author of more than 60 children’s books, mostly published in his pseudonym Dr. Seuss (though also published of the name Theo LeSieg and one as Rosetta Stone). His career is highly decorated in achievement awards for his contribution toward his works.


Krull helps her readers know Ted Geisel by telling us a story; beginning with, “Once upon a time (p. 7). She makes it relatable to children by starting out his life story as a little boy just like them. She describes the things that he liked and disliked. She also describes the street and the town that he grew up in. As an avid Dr. Seuss reader, I quickly began to see where his stories came from, his own back yard. She also let us know important details about his family; his father, ran the zoo (Little Ted spent a lot of time there).

Krull uses illustrations from Dr. Seuss’ books and her research to produce this authentic biography to her readers. She includes multiple perspectives on his actions growing up; presenting him as a man with both strengths and weaknesses. She uses a few devices to make her writing lively; interior monologue, indirect discourse, and inference. The depth of coverage is at an appropriate level for children. There is enough information about his life that will give readers of all ages a background of the man they know and love as Dr. Seuss.

This book rates five out of five. I grew up reading Dr. Seuss to myself and then raised my children reading Dr. Seuss. I use Dr. Seuss in lesson plans and intend to use them in my upper elementary school classroom! (Because I can read Dr. Seuss here or there, I guess you can say I can read him anywhere!)

The three ways that I may use this book in the elementary classroom are as follows: Guided Reading, Pre-Reading Plan, and QAR. 

     Guided Reading – Each day before reading describe the information that they are reading and assist the students to discuss the information that they know. Give them questions to assist them in their reading passage (like when you read this chapter, what Dr. Seuss books does this bring to mind?).

     Pre-Reading Plan- Build anticipation for this reading experience, by discussing what we know of Ted Geisel. Introducing his books that they know and ones that they may not heard of. Having students in a group discussion share their favorite books and quotes from Dr. Seuss.

     QAR – Ask literal questions students can pull from their reading, use questions that will allow students to pull in text from several areas of the book and think about the context and meaning of the book, further thinking by asking questions based on the book and what the student believes, and ask students their personal ideas on the themes of the book.

I read this book as a part of my #BookaDay Reading Challenge, inspired by Donalyn Miller. My goal is to read at least one children's literature book every weekday and share my thoughts here on my blog. Please feel free to subscribe or connect with me on social media to follow my journey through the books I read. Until next time ...

Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson


In Bridge to Terabithia, Katherine Paterson takes us on a journey through the life of a boy in
rural Virginia and how it is expanded when he befriends the new girl, Leslie. The lives of
both Jess and Leslie change dramatically due to their relationship and after an untimely
death of Leslie, the lives of many others in relationship to Jess who succumbs to the loss
of his best friend change as well. 

Two main settings for this book are; the rural Virginia and Terabithia. The setting is a rural area in the state of Virginia where the children live, work on the farm, and attend school. The issues of bullying, friendship, sibling, family are all of realistic value. It is not until Jess and Leslie build Terabithia out of their imaginations that the story becomes unrealistic, yet remains realistic as children often use their imaginations in this way.

This book rates five out of five. The story of friendship family, love and loss or major components of a book that can win the hearts of many young and old. Only forty years old, but I deem it a classic as it is timeless within its relatability in the past, present, and future.

For this book I would use a QAR reading strategy to build comprehension among the students. There are a lot of ideas, literary elements, vocabulary packaged within this book it would be beneficial to assist the students in unpacking it all or some of it based upon the maturity level. Providing questions for students to use pre- reading and then ignite discussion once the entire book or each chapter has been read.

In a classroom setting I believe a think aloud while reading the book to students to assist them with the overall comprehension of the story as the pictures in the book are black and white and difficult to see across a classroom. 

I read this book as a part of my #BookaDay Reading Challenge, inspired by Donalyn Miller. My goal is to read at least one children's literature book every weekday and share my thoughts here on my blog. Please feel free to subscribe or connect with me on social media to follow my journey through the books I read. Until next time ...

Banned Books Week and Property of the Rebel Librarian by Allison Varnes


Today (September 18, 2018) is Property of the Rebel Librarian's release day! I completely recommend purchasing it, reading it, and then sharing it with your students and/or children! Allison Varnes is brilliant at making her readers feel self-confident and enjoy a good laugh. The message is clear; little people can do big things, one person can make a difference, and books should not be censored. 

From the publisher: When twelve-year-old June Harper's parents discover what they deem an inappropriate library book, they take strict parenting to a whole new level. And everything June loves about Dogwood Middle School unravels: librarian Ms. Bradshaw is suspended, an author appearance is canceled, the library is gutted, and all books on the premises must have administrative approval. 

But June can't give up books . . . and she realizes she doesn't have to when she spies a Little Free Library on her walk to school. As the rules become stricter at school and at home, June keeps turning the pages of the banned books that continue to appear in the little library. It's a delicious secret . . . and one she can't keep to herself. June starts a banned book library of her own in an abandoned locker at school. The risks grow alongside her library's popularity, and a movement begins at Dogwood Middle--a movement that, if exposed, could destroy her. But if it's powerful enough, maybe it can save Ms. Bradshaw and all that she represents: the freedom to read.

Equal parts fun and empowering, this novel explores censorship, freedom of speech, and activism. For any kid who doesn't believe one person can effect change...and for all the kids who already know they can!

Next week (September 23-29, 2018) is Banned Books week. Banned Books Week is the annual celebration of the freedom to read. The event is sponsored by a coalition of organizations dedicated to free expression. Banned Books Week was launched in 1982 in response to a sudden surge in the number of challenges to books in schools, bookstores and libraries. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types — in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular. 

Watch this video, to learn more about banned books and the top ten books challenged last year.



This would be the perfect read aloud to make those aware of books that have been banned due to their material of various sorts and encourage those to speak out for those books that have been silenced. 

Reviews Published I would like to thank Netgalley for the advanced digital copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I read this book as a part of my #BookaDay Reading Challenge, inspired by Donalyn Miller. My goal is to read at least one children's literature book every weekday and share my thoughts here on my blog. Please feel free to subscribe or connect with me on social media to follow my journey through the books I read. Until next time ...

The Crossover by Kwame Alexander


Alexander Kwame uses rhyme and rap to entice and engage the reader. The poems
in this collection are medium in length, entertaining and speak to children in a way they
are likely to relate. Most of the passages in The Crossover are about events that can
happen in a child’s life; such as relationships with friends and family, basketball action
on the court, middle school, race, sickness, and death. In “Girls,” the author shares a
moment between his friend, a girl, and how his friend takes notice of her. This poem is a
representation of the author’s ability to speak to middle school students (mostly boys),
allowing them to relate with the author.



The author uses a variety of unique rhythms in his book. Some of the poems
make you think of a basketball dribbling up and down as you read the words on the
page. The author writes in free verse; this poetry is without a specific rhyme
Image: Nashville Scene
pattern or strict rhythm. He also uses concrete poetry to assist in his actions of words
within the poems, helping readers to see the action in a book with no pictures.

The author uses onomatopoeias to describe the sounds and the
actions of the basketball and the basketball players on the court; as well as the sounds
he hears in his daily activities. Alexander has a great way of making the reader feel that
he is talking to you and you are right there with him during these activities.
He also uses hyperboles to create emphasis on a specific scenario or action. In “Okay,
Dad,” he says, “Mom and JB have been talking your ear off all morning.” Exaggerating
this specific situation tells us readers that these two were talking a lot towards another.

Alexander uses poetic-hip-hop to bring motion into his words, allowing
his poetry to bounce off the page. His stories are short, to the point, and very relatable
to today’s middle school boy. The themes of The Crossover are relationships, consequences of actions, coping with illness and dealing with death.



This book rates five out of five. I genuinely loved each poem and it
is so very easy to read. I believe that boy or girl in my future upper elementary class that loves basketball and is hesitant to read, especially poetry, will love this book!

I read this book as a part of my #BookaDay Reading Challenge, inspired by Donalyn Miller. My goal is to read at least one children's literature book every weekday and share my thoughts here on my blog. Please feel free to subscribe or connect with me on social media to follow my journey through the books I read. Until next time ...

The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge by Hildegarde Hoyt Swift


Swift, uses personification to give the lighthouse, the bridge, and the boats a voice alongside the lighthouse keeper and bridge workers in The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge. The book has a chronological plot following the days of the little red lighthouse in his experience before and after the building of the Hudson River Bridge, in the setting of New York City. First, the protagonist, the little red lighthouse feels extremely proud of his job keeping the boats safe along the Hudson river. Until the day, the Hudson River Bridge is first put to use, as it becomes complete. This causing two sets of conflict within the story, person-against-person; as well as, person-against- self as the little red lighthouse feels inadequate and unnecessary. The book finishes with a solution to the conflict and the little red lighthouse and the great grey bridge working together as they still do today.

Ward uses beautiful watercolor paintings in this edition that restores the original design of the book published in 1942. Realistic art while giving human features to the main characters in the book; the lighthouse and the bridge. Allowing the reader an opportunity to see real-life images of the Hudson River Bridge, the lighthouse, and the steam boats. The darker colors and deeper lines used in the storm scene allows the reader to sense danger on the horizon. During the storm, Ward uses personification within the painting, giving the fog a face and hands to show how, “the thick fog crept over the river and clutched the boats” (p. 36).

Image: Daytonian in Manhattan

This book rates five out of five. I am a person who really enjoys lighthouses, for their beauty and their purpose. I also like the story Swift tells to children, that little people can do big things as she shows this little red lighthouse shining its big bright light protecting the ships that are near. Students can know that they are just as important as the big tall bridges that are near them, because each individual has a purpose and just because they are big they may not be able to do the same job. A reminder that every person is important no matter what size.

I read this book as a part of my #BookaDay Reading Challenge, inspired by Donalyn Miller. My goal is to read at least one children's literature book every weekday and share my thoughts here on my blog. Please feel free to subscribe or connect with me on social media to follow my journey through the books I read. Until next time ...

The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka


Alexander Wolf begins the chronological plot and his innocence as he was making a birthday cake for his dear old granny. The conflict arises when he realizes that he does not have enough sugar and he had a terrible sneezing cold. The conflict of person-against-person arises at the knock of the first, second, and third pigs home.

The main character, A. Wolf tries to ask the pigs for a cup of sugar so that he is able to make the cake for granny. He is retelling his story from the comfort of his prison cell. The story he tells is within his neighborhood.Unfortunately, the wolf sneezes quite terribly at each one of the homes causing them to come down to the ground, killing the pigs. The wolf unable to deny himself the right to a tasty meal, eats the poor little pigs. The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs features; the main character Alexander Wolf (a.k.a Big Bad Wolf) and the antagonist’s pig number one, pig number two, and pig number three.

Scieszka uses the point of view of Alexander Wolf to give a new side to the story most of us have read of the three little pigs. The author carefully chooses words and scenarios to describe the events in such a way that you may start to believe in the Wolf’s innocence. The sentences are short and to the point making this book easily read and understood. The theme of The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs, is that you cannot believe everything that you hear and there is always more than one side of the story.

This book rates five out of five. I really adored Scieszka’s version that character A. Wolf tries to pull off, of what “really” happened that day. It is such a fun read, to enjoy over and over again.

There are three ways that I may use this book in the upper elementary classroom are as follows: Think Aloud, Directed Reading Activity, and Anticipation Guide.

(1) Using the Think Aloud strategy I would begin by discussing the original story, The Three Little Pigs providing the necessary background information the students need to know to understand the retelling. Discuss the illustrations of the book as I begin to read the story. Reading with expression and in the voice of the wolf, I would then ask the students what the differences are between the Wolf’s story and the original. Ask the students to predict what will happen next, once the wolf has left the home of the first pig, and then again after the
second. When the Wolf is behind bars on the last page, I would ask the students if they believed his view of the events that happened that day.

(2) Using the Directed Reading Activity, I would first open the discussion by preparing the readers for the story giving them background information required to understand it; such as, the original three little pigs story and any words used in the book the students may not know yet. I would then present some questions to the students to guide them through their reading of the story to themselves. Once they have read the story themselves we could discuss the questions I asked them before they read, giving them plenty of opportunity to
go back and use the book as facts to back up their answers. I would conclude the activity with a handout or project that could further assess the goals and objectives I have in using this book.

(3) Using the Anticipation Guide strategy, I would create about three or four statements identifying the major concepts within the story (I believe everything that I read, there is only one side to every story, etc). Giving the students a chance to agree or disagree with these concepts prior to reading the story. After agreeing and/or disagreeing with such statements we would read the story aloud. Then we would return to the concepts presented to them at the beginning of the lesson where we can discuss if we still think the same way
we did at the beginning of the story or if we found that we have a new opinion based on what we learned from the story.

Here, in these exclusive audio and video interviews with Reading Rockets, Jon Scieszka talks about his "weird" style and his concern about boys and reading:



I read this book as a part of my #BookaDay Reading Challenge, inspired by Donalyn Miller. My goal is to read at least one children's literature book every weekday and share my thoughts here on my blog. Please feel free to subscribe or connect with me on social media to follow my journey through the books I read. Until next time ...