ISU TLP LESSON PLAN: Blog Writing Post

ISU TLP LESSON PLAN
Adapted for EDUC 3311 Instructional Technology

Name: Jeanie Cullip
Date: February 24, 2017
Title of Lesson: Blog Writing Post
Discipline/Content Area: ELA- Writing
Grade Level: 7th
Technology to be Used: Wi-Fi Capable Device, Write About Website
Lesson Duration (minutes/periods/days): 2.5 Class Periods
Rationale for Lesson: Narrative writing using the six-trait writing process with emphasis sentence structures, topic sentences, supporting details, and other paragraph skills. Digital writing on a blog enhances student writing, engages student writers, assists students in becoming more competent at typing, and allows students to write from anywhere. Gives students an audience (class, ELA classes, parents, teachers, Write About community and/or public).
1-2 Key ISTE-S Standard(s) Addressed:
·         ISTE.S.1. Creativity and innovation. Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.
·         ISTE.S.5.  Digital citizenship. Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.
1-2 Key Idaho Grade Level Content Standard(s) Addressed in Lesson:
·         CCRA.W.7.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
·         CCRA.W.7.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and link to and cite sources as well as to interact and collaborate with others, including linking to and citing sources.
1-2 Supporting Core English Language Arts Standard(s) Addressed in Lesson:
·         CCRA.W.7.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Lesson Learning Objectives (Restating key standards/goals in student language – introduction of the objectives must be incorporated into procedures):
·         I can produce a writing piece that is clear and coherent with idea development, organization and style appropriate to task, purpose and audience.
·         I can use technology, including the Internet to produce, revise, edit and publish writing.
·         I can use technology to interact and collaborate with others for an intended purpose.
·         I can identify audience, topic and purpose.
Prior content knowledge expectations: Narrative writing skills and the six-trait writing process.
Prior technology knowledge expectations: Students will need to have a demonstration on the Write About Website; basic tasks such as making text bold and italics and adding a hyperlink. Students will need to have basic digital citizenship awareness and netiquette.
Planned Formative Assessment (must be incorporated into procedures):
Assessment Description: Peer Review based on Rubric
Blooms Level(s): Create & Evaluate
Objectives (I can statements) Assessed:
·         I can use technology, including the Internet to produce, revise, edit and publish writing.
Assessment Rationale: A peer review is an effective method of measuring the growth of their peers writing; as well as, a learning experience which allows the reviewer to learn the concepts as well. Giving a deeper understanding of what is necessary to complete their own paper; while evaluating their peers. Students will be given feedback toward their revision process to make further edits prior to publishing. Teacher will be able to assess which students will need further discussion on conventions of writing/ six-trait writing process.
Link to written instructions and/or to hardcopy of assessment if applicable: (see below)


Summative Assessment (must be incorporated into procedures):
Assessment Description: Completion of Blog Post based on Rubric
Blooms Level(s): Creating
Objectives (I can statements) Assessed:
·         I can produce a writing piece that is clear and coherent with idea development, organization and style appropriate to task, purpose and audience.
·         I can identify audience, topic and purpose.
·         I can use technology to interact and collaborate with others for an intended purpose.
Assessment Rationale: Teacher will be able to assess the students understanding of narrative writing and the six-trait writing process and interaction with others through technology.  
Link to written instructions and scoring rubric if subjective, and/or to hardcopy of assessment if applicable: (see below)



Materials
Teacher Materials and Equipment (including technology):
Software and/or Internet Sites (Title & URL) if applicable:
·         Write About https://www.writeabout.com/
Equipment
·         Wi-Fi Capable Device
Non-copyrighted Printed Materials (if applicable) and Copyrighted Materials Cited in APA Structure (i.e. textbooks, research articles, trade books):
·         n/a
Student-Use Materials and Equipment (including technology):
·         Write About https://www.writeabout.com/
Your Teacher Technology Preparation: Teacher will have in-depth knowledge of the Write About website through preparation and usage of the sites functions; posting, editing, creating, adding pictures, embedding videos, etc. so that he or she may instruct students on how to perform these functions. Teacher will also have knowledge of the help available to correct any situations that may be had during student use.
Material Management:
·         Students will have 1:1 classroom or the use of computer lab to complete the assignment. Any incomplete work will be completed at home or library.


Lesson Methods, Strategies, and Procedures
Lesson Script
Time
Introduction
·         Begin by discussing blog writing and the writing process using a K-W-L Chart to find out what students already know about blogs, blogging, and the six-trait writing process.
·         Once students have exhausted their overall idea of the subject, ask them what it is that they would like to know more about. Write this down to make sure this is completed throughout the class period.
·         Write the following “I can” statements for the blog writing lesson on the board or use a power point presentation for your lecture:
o   I can produce a writing piece that is clear and coherent with idea development, organization and style appropriate to task, purpose and audience.
o   I can use technology, including the Internet to produce, revise, edit and publish writing.
o   I can use technology to interact and collaborate with others for an intended purpose.
o   I can identify audience, topic and purpose.
·         Discuss the “I can” statements and discuss any questions students may have.


5



5



5










5
Step-by-Step Lesson Procedures
·         Have students visit www.writeabout.com and log on to their account.
·         Review the features of the write about website and the features they will need to write a blog post.
·         Explain to students they will be selecting a prompt choice for their grade level, 5-8. They can choose the topic if they are writing a blog post 450-500 words (not a poem or list).
·         As a class begin the pre-writing process; audience is students/ teacher, find topic raise hand when selected for approval, select topic after approval, save to account, and begin brainstorming topic.
·         Create an outline for your blog post. Introduction, Topic Paragraph, and Conclusion. Teacher walks around for assistance
Wrap up for the class period; students need a completed, detailed outline at the beginning of class tomorrow.
·         Review yesterday’s class, confirm all students have complete outlines, and have students log on to Write About.
·         Provide a copy of the rubric for the students to review.
·         Students work individually to write blog post and proofread. Teacher walk around for assistance as needed.
·         Explain the rubric (see below) for formative (peer review) and summative (final teacher grading) assessment. Review Peer Review guidelines and expectations.
·         Each student has a number, these numbers are placed in a bowl. Teacher walks around room for each student to select a number of the student he or she will peer review the paper. Once the selection has been made the student will begin peer review of that student through the Write About Community. Completed Rubric (signed by student who completed it) is returned to the student.
·         Wrap up class; revision of paper from peer review to be completed by class tomorrow.
·         Students come to class having finished their final revision of their blog post.
·         Review netiquette and blog commenting.
·         Log on to Write About.
·         Each student finds three student blog posts on Write About Community and makes response comments. Teacher walks around for assistance.

3-5

5


ß


15


10-15


-----------


5-10



20

5


15









5


15-20

Closure
·         As a class return to the K-W-L chart that was began at the beginning of the lesson on Blog Post writing. Discuss the what they wanted to learn section and openly discuss what they learned during this process.
·         Return to the “I can” statements. Have the students write on a Post-It note a reflection of these and their ability in each statement. This will be their exit ticket for class today.


10


10

Differentiation
SLs
1. Provide one-on-one feedback during the brainstorming process and the blog writing process. Make sure they know exactly what they need to complete to finish their final post.
2. Provide students with a writing checklist handout to use during writing time. Giving them step-by step writing instructions to complete the blog post ensuring capitalization, punctuation, complete sentences, paragraph organization, etc.
ELLs
1. Provide a graphic organizer in their first language for organizing their blog post.
2. Provide Write About directions in their first language (video or written).
3. Provide one-on-one feedback during the brainstorming process and the blog writing process. Send an e-mail to their ELL assist/English teacher (this may be me as well) with assignment we are currently working on. This can be used as writing practice for this time.
ALs
1. Allow students to select a grade level above for topics (9+) on Write About
2. Give the students the opportunity to share their blog post on Write About within my other classes, to the Write About Community, or public for feedback from others on the Internet.
3.Give the student the opportunity to share the blog post with school newspaper or community newspaper for publication.


Blog Writing Post Rubric


Grade
Content
Conventions
Presentation
4
ð         Student responded to and incorporated all components of selected prompt.
ð         Student included a topic sentence, specific details, and a closing sentence for each paragraph.
ð         Student writing is thorough, organized, and on topic.
ð         Student spelled all words correctly.
ð         Student used perfect grammar with no errors.
ð         Student capitalized and punctuated with no errors.
ð         The first word of each paragraph is indented and words are spaced correctly.
ð         It is evident the student proofread the blog post and student work looks proficient.
3
ð         Student responded to and incorporated most of the essential information in selected prompt.
ð         Student included a topic sentence, many specific details, and a closing for each paragraph.
ð         Student writing is on-topic.
ð         Student had 1-2 spelling errors.
ð         Student used mostly correct grammar with 1-2 errors.
ð         Student capitalized and punctuated with 1-2 errors.
ð         The first word of each paragraph is indented and words are spaced correctly.
ð         The student proofread the blog post and the student work is complete.
2
ð         Student responded to and incorporated some of the essential information in the selected prompt.
ð         Student did not include a topic sentence, any specific details, and/or closing sentence for each paragraph.
ð         Student writing is incomplete and not on topic.
ð         Student had 3-4 spelling errors.
ð         Student used some correct grammar with 3-4 errors.
ð         Student capitalized and punctuated with 3-4 errors.
ð         Indent and spacing are inconsistent.
ð         Students work is incomplete, it is evident there is no proofreading completed.
1
ð         Student included no essential information from selected prompt.
ð         Student did not include a topic sentence, any details, or a closing sentence.
ð         Student writing is unfinished, disorganized, and off topic.
ð         Student spelled more than 5 words incorrectly.
ð         Student used poor grammar in more than five sentences.
ð         Student capitalized and punctuated writing with more than 5 errors.
ð         Student did not indent or organize writing in sentence or paragraph form.
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CHANGES IN INDIAN-WHITE RELATIONS IN IDAHO FROM 1805 TO 1877

History 4423: History of Idaho
Idaho State University

The region that we know as Idaho was full of great resources: clear sparkling rivers, land of rich soil, plenty of fish, variety of plants and animals, multitudes of unique gems, miles of peaceful flat lands, and rugged mountains. Indians from many tribes: Kootenai, Kalispel, Coeur d’ Alene, Palouse, Nez Perce, Shoshone, Paiute, and others were extremely blessed to be living in this place without disruption. That is until the white men, along with their influences, began to arrive; seeking exploration, missions, trade deals, refuge, and more. During 1805 to 1877, Indian-white relations in Idaho experienced several changes; amidst the unmet societal, economical, spiritual, and political expectations.
     Indians in the region of Idaho had a strong societal structure in which they formed to sustain peaceful relations among the many different tribes that inhabited the land. This structure was one that the white men could not comprehend; as it was severely diverse to their own in which the Indians could not understand. Elliot West, author of “Real People” in his book, The Last Indian War: The New Perce Story, states “The mutual misperceptions fouled communication and frustrated honest efforts to harmonize relations between the peoples, which made the Nez Perce social arrangement, as it was in fact and how it was misunderstood.”[1] Indian-white relations in Idaho experienced several changes; first, unmet societal expectations.
Elliot West explains this failed societal expectation among the white men and the Indians in the following quotation:
Whites responded by projecting onto the Nez Perces and others what they expected to be there – or in some cruder cases, what suited their needs at the time. Generally they assumed they were dealing with a rough equivalent of a state or nation, with parts knit into a whole that was firmly bounded and governed by a descending order of power. The gap between the society white authorities expected or needed to find and the subtle, multilayered society that was actually there relentlessly plagued the relations between whites and Nez Perces. [2]

     In the land of plenty, within their informal societal structure, the Indians had a mutual understanding of trade and their ability to provide a variety of resources to each and every tribe within the region. While Lewis and Clark were on their expedition they spoke with the Indians in expanding their resources through trade with white men. Elliot West, writes in “Marks of Friendship” in his book, The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, “The Nez Perces were leveraging what they had most of to get more what they lacked and embracing the chance that a widespread peace brokered by Lewis and Clark might give them power and material gain in a changing world. All indications are that they considered this an arrangement between equals calculated for the advantage of both.”[3] Indian-white relations in Idaho experienced several changes; second, unmet economical expectations. West describes this disastrous economical expectation, “The captains’ promised outlet on the plains never materialized, neither did their brokered peace, but their reports of abundant game brought an immediate response.”[4] During this time of arrangement, business was quite successful within fur trading, until all of the fur providing animals were caught and skinned on the East Coast. American Fur Company leader, John Jacob Aster drew up an incredible plan to benefit from this broken promise and sent Donald McKenzie to set up post.[5]
Elliot West shares this unfortunate encounter in the following quotation:
He brought a large load of goods, and the Nez Perce leaders he met were eager to deal – until he told them that he would swap only for beaver skins. The Nez Perces had no interest in trapping beavers; their annual round of fishing, gathering, and hunting left no time for it. McKenzie grew frustrated and angry; so did they. This was not the equal accommodation they had anticipated. Relations worsened.[6]

     Similar to their strong societal structure and economical means, the Indians also had a firm foundation in their own spiritual beliefs. Elliot West tells us in “The Place of Butterflies” in his book The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, “Nez Perce religion differed profoundly from Christianity.”[7] Indian-white relations in Idaho experienced several changes; third, unmet spiritual expectations. In meeting with different missionaries and spiritual leaders, like Spokan Garry, West also tells us, “They embraced some practices, such as Sabbath observance, while grafting other ideas and rituals onto their own traditions.”[8] This opened up the Indians to a variety of missionaries in between the years of 1825 and 1837: among them were Presbyterians Samuel Parker and Marcus Whitman and Protestants Jason and Daniel Lee. The Indians were welcoming of their visitors until trouble arose as they began to overstay their welcome and strongly place their beliefs against the ideals and values of the Indians. West explains, “The essential problem, however, was the gap between what Nez Perces and missionaries expected of each other… Above all, the Nez Perces expected the new spiritual presence to enrich their worldly well-being, to make their good life better…Missionaries meant them to be reborn out of their old lives into utterly new ones.”[9]
     As the United States grew west, Indians still held their ground in the region of Idaho. Elliot West reveals in “God Named This Land to Us” in his book The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, “The Nez Perces were prosperous and powerful and reasonable secure, living behind their mountains in country Coyote had given them, out of the way of forces that were breaking the others and transforming the West. That, however, was about to change.”[10] That change did come, after years through the Gold Rush, many major Indian conflicts, and the government’s inability to uphold promises; Indian-white relations in Idaho experienced a complete transformation; last, unmet political expectations. Elliot West explains the final change in “Conquering by Kindness”, “In the emerging new America, Indians would rapidly lose what political independence they had managed to keep before the Civil War. As for particulars, the Peace Policy relied on reservations, precisely bounded areas where a particular native group would live and be assigned a government agent.”[11]
     In conclusion, unmet societal, economical, spiritual, and political expectations were the causes in which Indian-white relations experienced changes in Idaho during 1805 to 1877. Misunderstood social structures that were perused to be fixed, business arrangements with one sided benefits, extremely different spiritual beliefs, and influentially enforced political values are some of the identifiable themes among the several characteristics and causes that divided the white men and the Indians towards a long-lasting separation in Idaho as well as in the United States.

Bibliography

West, Elliot. “Real People” In The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, Loc. 386, 467.
New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, Kindle Edition.

— . “Marks of Friendship” In The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, Loc. 608, 625,
642, 650. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, Kindle Edition

— . “The Place of the Butterflies” In The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, Loc. 879,
888, 947, 956. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, Kindle Edition

— . “God Named This Land to Us” In The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, Loc. 1554.
New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, Kindle Edition

— .  “Conquering by Kindness” In The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, Loc.
2069. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009. Kindle Edition



[1] West, Elliot. “Real People” In The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, Loc. 386. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, Kindle Edition.
[2] West, Elliot. “Real People” In The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, Loc. 467. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, Kindle Edition
[3] West, Elliot. “Marks of Friendship” In The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, Loc. 608. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, Kindle Edition
[4] West, Elliot. “Marks of Friendship” In The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, Loc. 625. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, Kindle Edition
[5] West, Elliot. “Marks of Friendship” In The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, Loc. 642. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, Kindle Edition
[6] West, Elliot. “Marks of Friendship” In The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, Loc. 650. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, Kindle Edition
[7] West, Elliot. “The Place of the Butterflies” In the Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, Loc. 879. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, Kindle Edition
[8] West, Elliot. “The Place of the Butterflies” In the Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, Loc. 879, 888. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, Kindle Edition
[9] West, Elliot. “The Place of the Butterflies” In the Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, Loc. 947, 956. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, Kindle Edition
[10] West, Elliot. “God Named This Land to Us” In the Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, Loc. 1554. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, Kindle Edition
[11] West, Elliot. “Conquering by Kindness” In the Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story, Loc. 2069. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, Kindle Edition